Complex Communication Needs in Hospital

How do non-verbal patients get their needs and wants across to staff in hospital?

After a recent hospital stay I have concerns about the level of accessibility that non-verbal patients (whether this be from a disability or from illness) have to a form of AAC (Augmentative and Alternative Communication) to enable them to communicate their needs and wants whilst in hospital. I would think communication in this situation is vital, the ability to tell staff if they are feeling unwell, in pain or if they need assistance. I am hoping that stroke wards give their patients access to communication boards or some form of AAC however at least in our local area I worry this is not the case. I had a friend ask me late last year if I could help her as she had a family member in hospital who had a fall and hit their head. They were no longer able to communicate and were becoming very frustrated and angry. I went online and found a variety of good hospital/health communication boards and resources, which I printed out for her. They were grateful.

In our situation we advised the hospital at our pre-op meeting of our daughter’s complex communication needs and how she communicates. It was all written down in her file. I guess we were hoping they would have some sort of communication board available to their staff to use with her. I am not sure who actually reads this information, as I know no one that we dealt with during our 8 days in hospital was aware of her issues. All the nurses would ask Caitlin questions and when they couldn’t understand what she was trying to say/sign they would just look to us to interpret. This was fine for our situation but what if the patient didn’t have someone there to interpret their communications for them. What happens then? It really worries and upsets me to think that these patients could be going through pain or feeling unwell because as a society we haven’t got basic procedures in place.

Prior to our hospital stay, I had prepared a number of resources that we took with us to assist our daughter as I wanted and needed her to have the ability to communicate with us. I started with a social story on her iPad explaining the operation she was going to have. I also had a variety of communication options at hospital including visuals, a health style communication board and a hospital communication page on her device. I am passionate about AAC and a huge advocate for making communication accessible to everyone. Unfortunately, I fear none of these resources are made available to other non-verbal patients.

I would love to hear from AAC users or their family members of any positive or negative stories in relation to communication in hospitals. It would be great to get an idea of the range of issues that exist and it would be great to hear of any hospitals or States that are doing a great job.

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